Urban 1925

Source: Unknown

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Avatar of John
Assistant Curator

John is a “snapper up of unconsidered trifles”. He studied psychology at Oxford University, has written for television and numerous publications, and has been exploring the net since before the web was born. He loves the retronautic feeling of time-vertigo.

10 Responses

  1. Matt

    He wasn’t a million miles away! You only have to look at today’s prefab apartments in most major cities to see this kind of close-knit living communities. He had the right idea putting the housing above the workplace, though. Would have cut down on a LOT of congestion.

    Reply
    • Ella

      Yeah i liked that idea too but my only potential beef with it is that people do tend to move from job to job, especially if they work contract or freelance.

      So either these people would have to end up commuting eventually anyway or they would end up having to move frequently. Which nobody wants to do.

      Reply
    • Hayley Flynn

      Actually, Scott, they seem to be resurrecting the plans or at least trying to but this time solely for a bike lane. I don’t know why people keep thinking it’s a good idea to have above level access with no policing! So many horror stories from the past about this kind of stuff going wrong, the Crescents in Hulme and of course…Trellick Tower in London.

      Reply
  2. Vlad

    Well, this could be real in 1950 if there were no wars. But always, some scientist is discovering something, military and politics take it for bad things.

    Reply
    • Ella

      Uh… so war was a huge reason the depression ended. In North America, war creates jobs. The downside is that ok, less time is spent on city planning. But there was a reason that the 40s and 50s were so economically profitable.

      Reply
  3. Miles

    In all honesty it’s not really all that far-fetched. The only real issue is that they didn’t consider that people would just build on and around old infrastructure rather than wholly replacing it as they would have to in order to create this scene. Well, that and the fact almost nobody besides Goodyear would be using zeppelins by 1950.

    Reply
    • Ella

      That’s the thing that I think a lot of architects fail to take into account, even today. We humans are not in the habit of rebuilding. We prefer to renovate.

      Still, I’d really like to see streets designed this way and I can’t for the life of me figure out why we haven’t at least made an attempt. In my city, we’re sitting on solid bedrock so that poses an enormous difficulty. But other cities are made for this construction and it saves so much space.

      Reply

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